Author: Max Borders

  • Getting Greed Out of Government

    Greed. It's a dirty word (a deadly sin, even). Some think only government can protect us from ourselves. But this view is mistaken. Maybe it comes from that helpless reflex-thought: "Somebody should do something about this!" We've all had it -- especially recently. And government, like God, comes into our thoughts almost as second nature whenever we want to explain something inexplicable, or fix something unfixable. But we must stand before our own natures with humility and acknowledge that we, as a species, are greedy.

  • Transportation: Traffic Jams, Roads Crumble, Reform Stalls

    The recently completed two-year budget cycle (2007-08) saw very little in the way of transportation reform. Rumor has it 2009 will be the year of transportation reform. Let’s hope so. Currently, the situation is dire.

  • Energy and Environment: Higher Prices, No Benefits

    The recently completed two-year budget cycle (2007-08) was marked by legislation that will make energy more expensive and do little, if anything, to protect the environment. The following highlights some of the major things our General Assembly did and didn’t do over the biennium:

  • Triangle Recycling is Waste, Theft, or Both

    Mandatory recycling programs don’t bother most people. But if you thought you were being forced to do something dumb or were getting ripped off—wouldn’t you be troubled? When it comes to municipal recycling in the Triangle, there are only two possible scenarios—either the things we recycle really are just garbage, or the city is helping big companies steal our labor and resources. Sound crazy? Bear with me.

  • Charlotte’s Traffic Woes Aren’t Going Anywhere

    Recent media reports about state Senator Tony Rand’s (D-Cumberland) grip on N.C. transportation resources have stirred up the Hornet’s Nest. Despite the fact that old Fayetteville buddies Secretary Lyndo Tippett and Sen. Rand have been content to let road resources get funneled down east for years, all this is apparently news to people west of Asheboro. That’s a shame.

  • Curing Healthcare…

    To cure our healthcare system, we have to look at the system holistically. Just one or two reforms will have a small effect. We need comprehensive reform. First, we must identify the pathologies. Then, we must offer prescriptions. But most reform efforts get this the wrong way around. In other words, many would like to treat the symptoms, but ignore the underlying problems.

  • Talking about Energy: Drill Here, Drill Now

    If we want gas prices to be lower, we have to increase supply. People are already responding to high prices by reducing their fuel consumption—and it hurts. We also have to increase our domestic supply. Therefore, we need to drill domestically and do it now. Period. This reality reflects the law of supply and demand.

  • Curing Healthcare: First Fix Problems Caused by Gov’t

    To cure our healthcare system, we have to look at the system holistically. Just one or two reforms will have a small effect. We need comprehensive reform. First, we must identify the pathologies. Then, we must offer prescriptions. But most reform efforts get this the wrong way around. In other words, many would like to treat the symptoms, but ignore the underlying problems.

  • Gas Prices, Profits and a Silver Lining

    At the Shell Station on Sherron Road in Durham, N.C., you would have paid $3.91 for a gallon of regular unleaded gasoline this week. Many in the Triangle are wondering: “How can oil companies justify record profits when I have to sell a kidney to fill up?” Somehow, they believe, that’s just not right. But isn’t it? There is a silver lining to high gas prices. And there is a modicum of right in the profits they’re earning, too. But allow me to back up.

  • North Carolina: Save Energy, End Recycling

    How can the state of North Carolina do its part to lower gas prices? We should put a moratorium on recycling program. That’s right. Stop recycling.

  • Culture of Goodie Chasing is Bad for Business

    Governor Easley believes his recent wooing of a Kansas-based aerospace company to the cobweb-covered Global TransPark will "silence" critics who have called the $80 million project a boondoggle for over a decade. Now that we've slept on the news, allow me to break the silence.

  • Understanding Healthcare Reform

    Healthcare reform is complicated. But everyone knows something needs to be done. We've taken the time to treat the issue in a two-part video, which includes a breakdown of the problems, as well as market-friendly solutions. (More)

  • When Consumers Are Driving Healthcare

    The next time you hear someone say the market is failing health care, ask him how much his last blood test cost. His failure to tell you won't be a memory lapse, but a symptom of our system. That is, the market never failed health care, the system did. The system? You know, that byzantine World War II-era arrangement among doctors, functionaries and insurers that leaves the patient (i.e., the consumer) out of the loop.

  • Triad to be Soaked for Triangle Rail

    Look out! You're about to be hit by a train. You'll probably rarely, if ever, ride Charlotte's LYNX system or the Triangle's proposed light rail, but you'll pay for them. Town planners, politicians, citizen activists and other special interests are gearing up to soak you for their urban transit. Much like the exorbitant pyramids built by Egyptians who used slave labor, shiny new transit projects will be constructed on the backs of smaller-town North Carolina taxpayers.

  • Can N.C. help the poor without making them dependent?

    Supporters of poverty fighter John Edwards are still coping with his exit from the presidential race. We can speculate endlessly about his loss – about Obama’s star quality, or Clinton’s experience-by-proxy. But one fact stands out: voters were not swayed by Edwards’ anti-poverty populism. Why? Maybe people know intuitively that there is only so much government can do about the poor.

Page 1 of 3123