Economy

  • State Motor Fuels Tax is Set to Rise by Nearly Four Cents in January

    The North Carolina Motor Fuels Tax (the state gas tax) is expected to go from 35 cents per gallon to 38.9 cents per gallon at the beginning of 2012 if no action is taken by the General Assembly, according to staff at the legislature and the Department of Transportation. The state Department of Revenue sets […]

  • Public Records Continue to Undermine Exaggerations of Layoffs

    Some Democrats and social justice advocates in North Carolina continue to throw around huge numbers of people who have been laid off due to cuts in the state budget. Representative Bill Faison (D-Orange) claimed in a press release  over 6,000 state jobs were lost because of the cuts and more state workers would lose their […]

  • Occupy Wall Street, the New Democratic Base?

    As the Occupy Wall Street (OWS) protests continue, it is being increasingly portrayed as a serious movement by several media outlets and politicians alike. Democratic politicians, at first skeptical of the movement, have lined up to attend and speak at rallies. They have been met, however, with mixed reception, as civil rights leader and U.S. […]

  • Debt Downgrade – Is North Carolina Next?

    The recent Standard & Poor’s downgrade of federal debt instruments sent waves of fear across indebted government agencies across the nation. Just days after the federal downgrade, S&P issued downgrades for thousands of municipal and other local bonds, including a series of bonds held by the Board of Governors of the University of North Carolina. […]

  • Trucking the Policy Trend

    Raleigh city officials are patiently considering revised regulations that would allow increased downtown access to food trucks, or freestanding mobile food vendors. City officials will meet again August 30th in pursuit of a full council decision by early September. Someone should save them the time. It’s not surprising that something that makes many residents very […]

  • Gas Relief a Legitimate Possibility

    OPEC (Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries) talks disintegrated last Wednesday, causing the price of oil to yet again rise over $100 a barrel, giving little hope of relief at the pump in the near future. While the price of oil rising is hardly recent news, the breakdown in efforts to reduce gas prices provides […]

  • Fees for Free Enterprise

    Government can do something for the people only in proportion as it can do something to the people. -Thomas Jefferson At this point budget cuts come as no surprise to government-funded programs, and as such they are already looking for ways to circumvent their budget shortfalls.  A time-honored and quickly adopted solution is to increase […]

  • New Regulations Burden Childcare Providers

    “Tell me about rules that defy common sense—rules that hinder job creation—slow progress… I can promise, North Carolina will listen to you.” – Governor Bev Perdue While Gov. Bev Perdue announced recently that there would be no new rules allowed to encumber businesses, a universally applauded measure to help expedite the economic recovery effort, the […]

  • Lawmakers Shouldn’t Ignore Transportation Spending and Tax Cuts

    It’s budget season again and the new Republican majority in Raleigh is scrambling to come up with almost $4 billion to fill in the state budget hole.  Budget items that are paid for by the General Fund, such as education, Medicaid and public safety are going to get the lion’s share of attention.   But […]

  • Optimism is Great, but Where are the Jobs?

    The January 2011 announcement of 1,900 jobs lost at the American Express Greensboro location is more jobs lost in Guilford County than in all of 2010 closings and layoffs put together. An area typically registering above the statewide unemployment average is now watching as a 25 year-old Greensboro big hitter call center takes its jobs, and philanthropic support, to Phoenix, Az., Salt Lake City, Utah, and Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. . . .

  • Waiting for Stimulation

    Reflecting on the economic reality in North Carolina throughout the recently-completed year of 2010 reveals some grim truths about the so-called stimulus, which should have by now long since rescued us from the depths of recession.

  • Read Between the Lines: Perdue Lacking Clear Vision

    The current $3.7 billion budget deficit facing North Carolina presents a golden opportunity to re-evaluate the size and scope of state government. Presented with this opportunity, however, Governor Bev Perdue has failed to clearly articulate her vision for government’s role in society.

  • ARRA: More Stagnation than Stimulation

    Nearly $800 billion and two years later, state government analysts are revealing the true impotence of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA); aka the federal stimulus bill. Recent data produced by North Carolina’s Fiscal Research Division shows that the federal stimulus in North Carolina has failed to live up to its name in terms of private sector job growth throughout the duration of the recession.

  • Public Fishing Piers Perceived as Job Creators

    Five goals that spell out the purpose of three North Carolina Aquarium fishing piers do not mention the word jobs. The three piers are Jennette’s Pier – currently under construction in Nags Head – and Emerald Isle and Carolina Beach piers, which are both in early stages of financing and development. Once the projects are done, North Carolina taxpayers will help finance $56 million to $75 million of the construction, as well as help pay for each pier’s operating and personnel budgets every year.

  • Creating Jobs a Risky Business

    In the recently completed election season, every candidate promised to be the one to trust to "create jobs." Indeed, in spite of some pretty heated rhetoric, jobs remained the most-used four-letter word on the campaign trail.

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