Immigration

Immigration Reform Long Time in Coming, Long Ways to Go

Immigration Reform Long Time in Coming, Long Ways to Go

  While not on the Republican’s “100 Days” 10-point legislative agenda when they swept the General Assembly in November, immigration reform still proved to be a major issue in both the House and Senate. In between heated legislative battles over subjects ranging from taxes to tanning beds, several bills were put forth in an effort […]

NC Senate Immigration Bill Gives Tacit Support to Arizona

North Carolina has followed suit in drafting immigration legislation in the wake of the recent Arizona illegal immigration law that enables the state to deal with this growing problem.

  • 20 Changes For 2010: Illegal Immigrants & Community Colleges

    The eleventh recommendation in the Civitas Institute Agenda “20 Changes for 2010: A Primer for State Reform” focuses on ending the admission of illegal immigrants to North Carolina community colleges.

  • NC Sheriffs Still Reporting Illegals

    Despite recent efforts by the federal government to restrain local law enforcement from using the 287 (g) program to identify illegal aliens for deportation, North Carolina sheriffs are still reporting the presence of illegal aliens who are booked in their jail.

  • No Places for Illegal Immigrants

    The State Board of the N.C. Community Colleges System is looking to change its policy to allow the admission of illegal immigrants -- again. If the board approves the new policy (currently, a recommendation from its policy committee), it will be the fifth change in nine years. While the board's zigzag track record inspires little confidence, the case for admitting illegal immigrants to N.C. community colleges inspires even less.

  • 2009 Session Legislative Recap Series: Immigration

    The North Carolina General Assembly continues to ignore one of the most important issues facing the state. Despite the introduction of several bills that would help solve some of the problems associated with illegal immigration in North Carolina, lawmakers in the legislative leadership closed their eyes and hoped the problems would go away on their own.

  • Jeff Mixon Talks to Tara Servatius on Illegal Immigration – 6-26-09

    Jeff Mixon Talks to Tara Servatius on Illegal Immigration - 6-26-09

  • Immigration Update From the North Carolina General Assembly

    Business growth over the last decade in North Carolina (prior to the current economic situation) has brought a corresponding growth in the number of illegal aliens in the state. Civitas Institute opinion polls have consistently shown a significant level of concern amongst the state’s voters about how state government should respond to the problem of illegal immigration in North Carolina.

  • How Much Is The Rule of Law Worth?

    It is a commonplace these days to blame – or justify – everything on the bad economy. Need to nationalize the banks? Well, it’s a bad economy. Need to print up trillions of dollars in new debt? It’s the bad economy. Forgot your wife’s birthday; it’s the economy.

  • Dispelling Myths About 287(g)

    Judging from all the negative attention 287(g) has attracted lately, you would think it was responsible for the recession, global warming and the state budget deficit. The 287(g) program is a federal-local partnership that trains local law enforcement to enforce immigration law. Seven North Carolina counties, along with the city of Durham, currently participate in the initiative.

  • 10 Things You Need to Know about 287(g): A Response to the ACLU/UNC Study

    In mid-February 2009, the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) of North Carolina and the Immigration and Human Rights Policy Clinic of UNC-Chapel Hill issued a report declaring that the 287(g) program should be eliminated because it is “too problematic, too costly, and too difficult to implement.” The 287(g) program is a federal-local partnership that trains local law enforcement to enforce immigration law. Seven North Carolina counties, along with the city of Durham, currently participate in 287(g).

  • Local Immigration Resolutions in North Carolina

    Many local and state officials claim their hands are tied when it comes to immigration enforcement. “It’s a federal issue,” they say – as if to suggest they would change things if only they could. By contrast, the U.S. Department of Justice has confirmed that as “sovereign entities” states and localities “have the inherent authority to enforce civil and criminal violations of federal immigration law.”

  • State and Local Immigration Laws Throughout the United States

    Think your state or county can’t do anything about illegal immigration? The truth is that as sovereign entities states have always played a significant role in enforcing U.S. immigration law – and prior to the late 1800s, crafting their own immigration policies. Read more for a run down of current state and local immigration reform policies.

  • Immigration: N.C. Continues to Be a Magnet State

    While South Carolina, Arizona, and Oklahoma enacted comprehensive immigration reform during the 2007-08 biennium, the General Assembly passed piecemeal legislation that did little to discourage illegal aliens from coming to North Carolina.

  • Illegal Aliens and Community Colleges: Let the Voters Decide

    Kudos to N.C. Community College System (NCCCS) President Scott Ralls. Faced with the prospect of yet again changing the community college system’s stance on enrolling illegal aliens, Ralls asked the State Board of Community Colleges to take up this controversy at its next meeting on August 15.

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