Issues

Possible Judicial Bias in North Carolina Voter ID Case

Possible Judicial Bias in North Carolina Voter ID Case

Remarks made by an associate justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court at a Democratic Party fund-raising dinner, as well as her membership in a private organization, raise serious questions about her possible bias against the state’s new voter ID law. Under applicable judicial ethics rules, she should remove herself from the controversial litigation challenging the law before it reaches the state Supreme Court.

NC Population Estimates Tell Different Stories for NC LEAs

NC Population Estimates Tell Different Stories for NC LEAs

Over the last few years there have been many comments about overcrowded K-12 classrooms and understaffed schools. Often observers tie these problems to North Carolina's growing population in ways that suggest the need for more funding for public schools.

  • But Wait There’s More! Event Center to Cost Extra $4.8 Million!

    With a City Councilman who is a race baiter and a “Witness Wednesday” arrestee, another councilman who voted to give money to an organization of which he is a board member, and plenty of other questions about whether an event center would be a good investment, why should we trust the Rocky Mount City Council? […]

  • Election Reforms Reveal Vote Fraud

    A stunning report by the State Board of Elections has revealed clear voter fraud in the 2012 election – evidently in tens of thousands of instances. The North Carolina State Board of Elections reported Wednesday to the Joint Legislative Elections Oversight Committee on the effects of the state’s new voter reforms. The most disturbing statistics […]

  • Teacher Pay: A Problem Money Can’t Fix

    This article is Part I of a two-part series examining how North Carolina’s public school system pays its teachers. Teacher pay: It’s a subject on the minds of many in North Carolina these days. Last month Gov. Pat McCrory announced a plan to boost salaries for starting teachers roughly 14 percent over two years to […]

  • Legislative Follow Up to Questions about Prisoner Health Care

    There are many questions that are asked in legislative meetings and many times the staff notes that they will have to follow up with those questions at a later meeting. Some of these questions were answered at the March Joint Legislative Oversight Committee on Justice and Public Safety meeting. At a prior meeting a question […]

  • Why conservatives, too, should crave open government

    The following article was adapted from an oped published today in the News & Observer. Newspapers, activists and all who care about open government recently celebrated “Sunshine Week.” Now it’s time for North Carolina conservatives to make 2014 Sunshine Year. People across the spectrum profess the importance of open records, transparent government and the people’s […]

  • Civitas Statement to Common Core Study Committee

    Below is a transcript of the comments made by Civitas Senior Policy Analyst Bob Luebke to the LRC Common Core Study Committee on March 20, 2014. Good morning to members of the General Assembly and guests.  My name is Bob Luebke. I am a Senior Policy Analyst with Civitas Institute and our organization hosts a […]

  • Another Look at NC Election Results

    Elections can be viewed at many different angles, from analyzing voter turnout to interpreting vote totals. That’s what consultants and candidates do to win races and election junkies do for fun. Voter turnout, broken down by demographics – i.e. party affiliation, gender, race and age ­– is important in understanding why the electorate votes the […]

  • What UNC’s Poverty Center Was Hiding

    A public records request filed by the Civitas Institute confirms that the UNC Poverty Center continues to use publicly funded resources for blatantly political activities in ways that are inappropriate, violate UNC policies, and possibly illegal. Email records show that the center – formally the UNC Center for Poverty, Work, & Opportunity – hosted an […]

  • Making Sense of Teacher Pay

    Do other professions require their “best” employees to give up an accomplishment to get a raise?  Do other professions use raises to lure employees into giving up due process?  Those are two questions Wake County public school teacher Dyane Barnett asked in a recent op-ed in the (Raleigh) News & Observer. You don’t need to […]

  • The Myth of ‘Trickle-Down Economics’

    Pop quiz: what do you do when you are a politician who finds himself incapable of debating the merits of an opposing viewpoint? Answer: invent a viewpoint no one holds, critique that viewpoint, and claim intellectual victory. That’s what happens when politicians talk about “trickle-down economics” – when in fact the truth is exactly the […]

  • Cooper Should Practice What He Preaches

    According to WRAL, Attorney General Roy Cooper is pressing Gov. Pat McCrory to roll back “special service charges” imposed on certain requests for public records. Maybe he should first pressure his own office to do so. Under the policy, such charges are incurred “for any requests that require agency personnel more than 30 minutes to […]

  • Surprise, Surprise: Criminals Have Handguns

    “When guns are outlawed,” the adage goes, “only outlaws will have guns.” That certainly seems to be the case in Charlotte: A Civitas analysis of gun-related arrests in Charlotte indicates that at least 66 percent of arrestees were ineligible to purchase handguns. Using public records, Civitas requested data on all handgun crimes committed in the […]

  • To create jobs, promote access to opportunity via human networks

    By U.S. Sen. Mike Lee Like most Americans, I support the ability of individuals to collect unemployment insurance for a limited amount of time. But in order to start solving the problem of long-term unemployment, this debate has to begin addressing the president’s broken policies that are making it more difficult to find work. By […]

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